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RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS: Benjin’s Asian Bistro Cited for Food Preparation, Health Reporting Violations

| September 12, 2016 | 0 Comments | News

restaurantinspectionslogoDuring a routine inspection Aug. 29, the Prince William Health District cited Benjin’s Asian Bistro in Bristow for multiple violations of the health code.

The restaurant, located at 9110 Devlin Rd #130, was cited for one priority violation, one core violation and one priority foundation violation.

According to the inspection report, these include:

Priority: Employees and conditional employees are not aware of the reporting procedures concerning information about their health and activities if they are suspected of causing, or being exposed to a confirmed disease outbreak caused by Typhoid fever (caused by Salmonella Typhi), Salmonella (nontyphodial), Shigella spp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Hepatitis A virus or Norovirus.

Core (Corrected During Inspection): Employees and conditional employees are not aware of the reporting procedures concerning information about their health and activities if they are suspected of causing, or being exposed to a confirmed disease outbreak caused by Typhoid fever (caused by Salmonella Typhi), Salmonella (nontyphodial), Shigella spp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Hepatitis A virus or Norovirus.

Priority Foundation (Corrected During Inspection): Hot water is not available in sufficient quantities to meet the use demands of the food establishment.

Click here to search for detailed information about this restaurant.

“Restaurant inspections are normally scheduled for one to four inspections per year, depending on the complexity of the menu, how much food is made from raw products, and how much is made in advance rather than cooked-to-order,” the agency states on their website.

When violations are observed during a routine inspection, they are detailed in a report and classified as either critical (posing a direct or immediate threat to consumers) or non-critical (a failure of cleaning or maintenance), the agency said.

These inspections are considered by the Health District as a snapshot of a specific day of operation.

According to the agency, “Ideally, an operation would have no critical violations, or none which are not corrected immediately and not repeated. In our experience, it is unrealistic to expect that a complex, full-service food operation can routinely avoid any violations.”

© 2016, Bristow Beat. All rights reserved.

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